Schol Comm @ UBC Blog

Under Creative Construction: A TLEF Supported Project

November 7th featured an event celebrating the launch of Under Creative Construction: A More Just World, an instructional video and the second Open Educational Resource (OER) created with the support of the Library’s Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) grant. This grant has allowed the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office to work closely with UBC faculty and partner in the creation of open educational resources.

The video explores the importance of creativity in social and environmental justice movements around the globe. Dr. Farah Shroff talks with prominent local activists Morgane Oger and Dale Edwards about the roles that creativity and art have played in their activism, and the potential it holds in supporting justice movements. The launch was attended by students and members of the community and was simultaneously made open, allowing the work to be shared with the public.

Zachary Foote, a Graduate Academic Assistant with the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office, worked closely with Dr. Farah Shroff in making this project a reality. This has been a great opportunity for library and faculty to explore different kinds of open educational resources, and the creativity that can be brought to its creation. One of the most surprising results of this has been the abundance of media-based projects that faculty are developing for the classroom, along with open textbooks. The creation of the instructional video with Dr. Shroff shows the breadth of paths that OERs can take, and ways that the library can support those efforts.

Open Access Week: Paywall the Movie

A documentary released earlier this year and screened as a part of UBC’s Open Access Week, Paywall: The Business of Scholarship focuses on the need for open access to science and research. Produced and directed by Jason Schmitt, a professor at Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York, this movie questions the $25.2 billion a year paid to academic publishers and the huge margin of profit gained by those businesses.

Although profitable to publishers, paywalls (restricted access to a site unless the user has paid for a description) reduce the access to scholarship. Smaller universities are often unable to afford access to the latest research and people unaffiliated with a university are unable to access it at all. Open Access is the movement responding to this by working to provide an alternative to the business of academic research. The movie describes the ins and outs of research publishing, discusses proprietary and open access, the impact of dominant publishers such as Elsevier, and how a lack of accessibility affects research.

In order to explore multiple aspects of the issue, the movie presents the information through interviews a wide range of people, including professors, CEOs, librarians, PHD students, and those involved in the publishing industry. .

This movie is a great way to get an introduction to scholarly publishing and Open Access. As in keeping with the subject the movie is free to access and download. To watch the movie either click on the video above or  follow the link here.

New UBC Funding to Support Scholarly Dissemination

With support from the Provost’s Office, UBC now offers $20,000 per year to support dissemination of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

Any UBC Vancouver faculty member can apply for the award, which can be used for dissemination expenses such as:

  • APC’s (article processing charges) or other fees related to publishing one’s scholarly work as open access (up to $2,000)
  • Conference registration and travel costs (up to $1,000)

Funds are managed and adjudicated by the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) and the Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISoTL).

For more information see: https://isotl.ctlt.ubc.ca/sotl-dissemination-fund/

 

Our First TLEF Supported project is Live




As mentioned in a previous blog post, the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office was awarded a Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund grant for the 2018/2019 cycle. With this grant funding, we have in turn granted out smaller amounts to support faculty creation of OER and open textbooks.

We are now proud to introduce the first product to come out of this project, Digital Meijis: Revisualizing Modern Japanese History at 150. This collection of visual essays has been adapted from The Meiji at 150 Project. Led by Tristan Grunow, Assistant Professor without Review, History Department and Naoko Kato, Japanese Language Librarian, Asian Library, this initiative celebrates the 150th anniversary of Japan’s 1868 Meiji Restoration and seeks to increase collaboration between scholars at universities across Canada, Japan, and the United States, strengthening UBC’s ties to Japanese studies programs around the region in disciplines including, and beyond, history, as well as magnifying the presence of UBC and UBC’s Japanese collections in the field of Japanese studies in North America.

Scholarly Communications and Copyright Unit Impact Report

Recently the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office released its 2017/2018 Impact and Activity Report, showcasing some of the year’s highlights and accomplishments.

For more information, or to share feedback please contact scholarly.communications@ubc.ca

Read the Report.

ORCIDs surpass 5-million mark

An ORCID iD is a way of establishing trusted connections between you, your scholarly works, and your professional activities and affiliations.  It’s also a sure way of distinguishing yourself from other scholars with similar names – aka ‘disambiguation.’ 

ORCID has become a worldwide standard widely used in publishing, granting, and online research networks.  In July 2018, ORCID logged its 5-millionth member.

UBC is an ORCID-CA member and is in early planning for campus implementation, including an ORCID sign-up campaign this fall.

Watch this site or consult this guide  for more information.